Angebote zu "Writing" (115 Treffer)

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Politics as You Like It
24,49 € *
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Politics as You Like It ab 24.49 € als Taschenbuch: Commentary from the Internet an Example of Writing from the World Wide Web. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Taschenbücher, Wirtschaft & Soziales,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Entrepreneur, How to Start an Online Business ,...
9,95 € *
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The secrets of the UK’s biggest online entrepreneurs revealed. Thinking of starting a business? Already have a business online and looking to take it to the next level? The wonderful world wide web has made creating a start-up that much easier. Thousands of people are out there reaping the rewards the web can bring. If you want to join them, you’ve come to the right place. Profiling today’s foremost web entrepreneurs, Lucy Tobin - who meets successful business founders every week writing an enterprise column for the Evening Standard - takes us through their start-up stories and maps out exactly what’s made them so successful. With interviews, practical advice and insights, you’ll hear first-hand from the bright sparks behind some of the UK’s top online businesses, learn how they did it, what they recommend, and how you can do it too. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Tania Rodrigues. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/adbl/011193/bk_adbl_011193_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Practical Node.js
25,99 € *
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Learn how to build a wide range of scalable real-world web applications using a professional development toolkit. If you already know the basics of Node.js, now is the time to discover how to bring it to production level by leveraging its vast ecosystem of packages.With this book, you'll work with a varied collection of standards and frameworks and see how all those pieces fit together. Practical Node.js takes you from installing all the necessary modules to writing full-stack web applications. You'll harness the power of the Express.js and Hapi frameworks, the MongoDB database with Mongoskin and Mongoose. You'll also work with Pug and Handlebars template engines, Stylus and LESS CSS lanaguages, OAuth and Everyauth libraries, and the Socket.IO and Derby libraries, and everything in between. This exciting second edition is fully updated for ES6/ES2015 and also covers how to deploy to Heroku and AWS, daemonize apps, and write REST APIs. You'll build full-stack real-world Node.js apps from scratch, and also discover how to write your own Node.js modules and publish them on NPM. Fully supported by a continuously updated source code repository on GitHub and with full-color code examples, learn what you can do with Node.js and how far you can take it! What You'll Learn Manipulate data from the mongo console Use the Mongoskin and Mongoose MongoDB libraries Build REST API servers with Express and Hapi Deploy apps to Heroku and AWS Test services with Mocha, Expect and TravisCI Implement a third-party OAuth strategy with Everyauth Web developers who have some familiarity with the basics of Node.js and want to learn how to use it to build apps in a professional environment.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Practical Node.js
25,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Learn how to build a wide range of scalable real-world web applications using a professional development toolkit. If you already know the basics of Node.js, now is the time to discover how to bring it to production level by leveraging its vast ecosystem of packages.With this book, you'll work with a varied collection of standards and frameworks and see how all those pieces fit together. Practical Node.js takes you from installing all the necessary modules to writing full-stack web applications. You'll harness the power of the Express.js and Hapi frameworks, the MongoDB database with Mongoskin and Mongoose. You'll also work with Pug and Handlebars template engines, Stylus and LESS CSS lanaguages, OAuth and Everyauth libraries, and the Socket.IO and Derby libraries, and everything in between. This exciting second edition is fully updated for ES6/ES2015 and also covers how to deploy to Heroku and AWS, daemonize apps, and write REST APIs. You'll build full-stack real-world Node.js apps from scratch, and also discover how to write your own Node.js modules and publish them on NPM. Fully supported by a continuously updated source code repository on GitHub and with full-color code examples, learn what you can do with Node.js and how far you can take it! What You'll Learn Manipulate data from the mongo console Use the Mongoskin and Mongoose MongoDB libraries Build REST API servers with Express and Hapi Deploy apps to Heroku and AWS Test services with Mocha, Expect and TravisCI Implement a third-party OAuth strategy with Everyauth Web developers who have some familiarity with the basics of Node.js and want to learn how to use it to build apps in a professional environment.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.02.2020
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The Future , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 216min
9,95 € *
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In this volume of the MIT Press's Essential Knowledge series, Nick Montfort argues that the future is something to be made, not predicted. Montfort offers what he considers essential knowledge about the future, as seen in the work of writers, artists, inventors, and designers (mainly in Western culture) who developed and described the core components of the futures they envisioned. Montfort's approach is not that of futurology or scenario planning; instead, he reports on the work of making the future - the thinkers who devoted themselves to writing pages in the unwritten book. Douglas Engelbart, Alan Kay, and Ted Nelson didn't predict the future of computing, for instance. They were three of the people who made it. Montfort focuses on how the development of technologies - with an emphasis on digital technologies - has been bound up with ideas about the future. Listeners learn about kitchens of the future and the vision behind them; literary utopias, from Plato's Republic to Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland; the Futurama exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair; and what led up to Tim Berners-Lee's invention of the World Wide Web. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Sean Pratt. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/gdan/002839/bk_gdan_002839_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.02.2020
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The Little, Brown Handbook, Global Edition
51,99 € *
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For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks – unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliabilityThe Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available–with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab™ not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts. Features + Benefits This title is a Pearson Global Edition. The Editorial team at Pearson has worked closely with educators around the world to include content which is especially relevant to students outside the United States. Accessibility and Ease of Use Authoritative and accessible coverage of the writing process, grammar, research, and documentation have made The Little, Brown Handbook one of the bestselling handbooks of all time. A clean, uncluttered page design uses color and type clearly to distinguish parts of the book and elements of the pages. Annotations on both visual and verbal examples connect principles and illustrations. Dictionary-style headers in the index make it easy to find entries, and helpful endpapers offer several paths to the book’s content. NEW! Streamlined explanations and new explanatory headings throughout make key information easier to find. Academic Writing NEW! A greatly expanded overview of common academic genres in the chapter on academic writing (now at the start of Part 2), such as responses, critical analyses, arguments, informative and personal writing, and research papers and reports, highlights key features of each genre and points students to examples in the handbook. NEW! A summary box titled “The writing situation” with each of the sample papers gives an overview of the situation to which the student responded–subject, purpose, audience, genre, and use of sources–thus connecting concepts with actual writing. NEW! Eighteen examples of academic writing in varied genres appear throughout the handbook, among them a new critical analysis of an advertisement and a new social-science research report documented in APA style. Synthesis receives special emphasis wherever students might need help balancing their own and others’ views, such as in responding to texts and visuals. NEW! The expanded chapter on critical reading and writing includes two full-length opinion pieces as exercises in critical reading, a new advertisement with a student’s analysis, a revised discussion of writing critically about texts and visuals, and a new critical analysis paper. Parts 9 and 10 give students a solid foundation in research writing and writing in the disciplines (literature, other humanities, social sciences, natural and applied sciences), along with extensive coverage of documentation in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! Key material on academic integrity in Chapter 6 on academic writing and Chapter 44 on plagiarism discusses developing one’s own perspective on a topic, using and managing sources, and avoiding plagiarism. Other chapters throughout the handbook reinforce these important topics. Research Writing and Documentation To help students develop their own perspectives on their research subjects, the text advises asking questions, entering into dialog with sources, and presenting multiple views fairly and responsibly. Extensive attention to research methods supports students in the early stages of research. The discussion of searching for and evaluating sources–library, Web, and social media–helps students to refine search terms and to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources. Case studies show the application of critical criteria to sample articles, Web documents, and a blog. NEW! A streamlined discussion of gathering information from sources stresses keeping accurate records of source material and marking borrowed words. Meticulous attention to research writing across the disciplines emphasizes managing information, using the library as a research gateway, evaluating and synthesizing sources, avoiding plagiarism, and documenting sources accurately. Students learn how to document and cite sources ethically in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! A chapter on documenting sources explains key features of source documentation, defines the relationship between in-text citations and a bibliography, and presents pros and cons of bibliography software. NEW! Updated, annotated samples of key source types illustrate MLA and APA documentation, showing students how to find the bibliographical information needed to cite each type and highlighting the similarities and differences between print and database sources. NEW! Reorganized chapters for all four styles group sources by type, thus simplifying the process of finding appropriate models and clarifying differences among print, database, Web, and other sources. NEW! A succinct guide accompanies the index to the models in each style to help students match their sources with appropriate citation formats. NEW! The chapter on CSE documentation reflects the new eighth edition of Scientific Style and Format: The CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers. NEW! A complete social-science research report shows APA style in the context of student writing. Two research papers illustrate MLA style and include a paper-in-progress, following a student through the research process and culminating in an annotated essay on green consumerism. The extensive chapter on avoiding plagiarism discusses deliberate and careless plagiarism, shows examples of plagiarized and revised sentences, and gives updated advice about avoiding plagiarism with online sources. Writing As a Process NEW! A reorganized presentation of drafting, revising, and editing distinguishes revising more clearly as a step separate from editing. NEW! An expanded discussion of thesis covers using the thesis statement to preview organization. NEW! New, relevant examples in Chapter 4 on paragraphs illustrate important concepts of coherence, organization, and development. NEW! A revised and streamlined chapter on presenting writing focuses on essential information related to document design, visuals and other media, writing for online environments, and oral presentations. NEW! A revised discussion of preparing a writing portfolio gives an overview of common formats and requirements. Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation NEW! Revised explanations of grammar concepts and rules throughout simplify the presentation and emphasize key material. NEW! Two common trouble spots—sentence fragments and passive voice—are discussed in greater detail and illustrated with new and more examples. NEW! Dozens of new and revised examples and exercises clarify and test important concepts. NEW! Added examples in Part 8 on effective words show common shortcuts of texting and other electronic communication and how to revise them for academic writing. Visual and Media Literacy Thorough discussions of critically reading advertisements, graphs, and other visuals appear in Chapter 7 on critical reading, Chapter 8 on reading arguments, and Chapter 43 on working with sources. NEW! A student work-in-progress illustrates the process of analyzing an advertisement and culminates in a sample critical analysis. NEW! Updated and detailed help with preparing or finding illustrations appears in Chapter 5 on presenting writing and Chapter Preface for Students: Using This Book Preface for Instructors PART 1: The Process of Writing 1. Assessing the Writing Situation a. Understanding how writing happens b. Analyzing the writing situation c. Discovering and limiting a subject d. Defining a purpose e. Considering the audience f. Understanding genres 2. Discovering and Shaping Ideas a. Discovering ideas b. Developing a thesis c. Organizing ideas SAMPLE INFORMATIVE ESSAY 3. Drafting, Revising, and Editing a. Writing the first draft b. Revising a draft c. Giving and receiving comments d. Examining a sample revision e. Editing the revised draft f. Preparing and proofreading the final draft g. SAMPLE FINAL DRAFT (RESPONSE ESSAY) h. Preparing a writing portfolio 4. Writing and Revising Paragraphs a. Relating paragraphs in the essay b. Maintaining paragraph unity c. Achieving paragraph coherence d. Developing the paragraph e. Writing special kinds of paragraphs 5. Presenting Writing a. Formatting academic writing SAMPLE MARKETING REPORT b. Using visuals and other media in multimodal writing c. Presenting writing on the Web SAMPLE WEB SITE SAMPLE LITERACY NARRATIVE POSTED TO A BLOG d. Making oral presentations SAMPLE POWERPOINT SLIDES PART 2: Reading and Writing in and out of College 6. Writing in Academic Situations a. Determining purpose and audienceb. Using an academic genrec. Choosing structure and content d. Using sources with integritye. Using academic language f. Communicating with instructors and classmates 7. Critical Reading and Writing a. Using techniques of critical reading b. Summarizing c. Developing a critical response d. Viewing visuals critically e. Writing criticallyf. Examining sample critical analyses SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF A TEXT SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF AN IMAGE 8. Reading Arguments Critically a. Recognizing the elements of argument b. Testing claims c. Weighing evidence d. Discovering assumptions e. Watching language, hearing tone f. Judging reasonableness g. Recognizing fallacies h. Reading visual arguments 9. Writing an Argument a. Finding a subject b. Conceiving a thesis statement c. Analyzing your purpose and your audience d. Using reason e. Using evidence f. Reaching your readers g. Organizing your argument h. Revising your argument i. SAMPLE PROPOSAL ARGUMENT 10. Taking Essay Exams a. Preparing for an essay examination b. Planning your time and your answer c. Starting the essay d. Developing the essay e. Rereading the essay 11. Public Writing a. Writing on social media b. Writing business letters and memos SAMPLE LETTER AND MEMO c. Writing a job application SAMPLE LETTER AND RESUMES d. Writing business reports and proposals SAMPLE REPORT AND PROPOSAL e. Writing for community work SAMPLE NEWSLETTER, ONLINE POST PART 3: Grammatical Sentences 12. Understanding Sentence Grammar a. Understanding the basic sentence b. Expanding the basic sentence with single words c. Expanding the basic sentence with word groups d. Compounding words, phrases, and clauses e. Changing the usual word order f. Classifying sentences 13. Case of Nouns and Pronouns a. Compound subjects and complements b. Compound objects c. We or us with a noun d. Appositives e. Pronoun after than or as in a comparison f. Subjects and objects of infinitives g. Who vs. whom h. Case before a gerund 14. Verbs Verb Forms a. Regular and irregular verbs b. Sit and set; lie and lay; rise and raise c. Omitted -s and -ed endings d. Helping verbs e. Verb plus gerund or infinitive f. Verb plus participle Tense g. Appropriate tense for meaning h. Sequence of tenses Mood i. Subjunctive verb forms Voice j. Active vs. passive voice 15. Agreement a. Agreement between subject and verb b. Agreement between pronoun and antecedent 16. Adjectives and Adverbs a. Adjectives only with nouns and pronouns b. Adjectives after linking verbs c. Adjectives with objects; adverbs with verbs d. Comparative and superlative forms e. Double negatives f. Overuse of nouns as modifiers g. Present and past participles as adjectives h. A, an, the, and other determiners PART 4: Clear Sentences 17. Sentence Fragments a. Tests for sentence completeness, revision of fragments b. Subordinate clause c. Verbal or prepositional phrase d. Other fragments e. Acceptable uses of incomplete sentences 18. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences a. Main clauses not joined by coordinating conjunction b. Main clauses related by a conjunctive adverb or transitional expression c. Main clauses with no conjunction or punctuation 19. Pronoun Reference a. Clear reference to one antecedent b. Clear placement of pronoun and antecedent c. Reference to specific antecedent d. Indefinite use of you e. Clear use of it f. Appropriate who, which, that 20. Shifts a. Person and number b. Tense and mood c. Subject and voice d. Indirect and direct quotations and questions 21. Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers a.For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks - unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliability The Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available-with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab(TM) not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.02.2020
Zum Angebot
The Little, Brown Handbook, Global Edition
51,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks – unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliabilityThe Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available–with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab™ not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts. Features + Benefits This title is a Pearson Global Edition. The Editorial team at Pearson has worked closely with educators around the world to include content which is especially relevant to students outside the United States. Accessibility and Ease of Use Authoritative and accessible coverage of the writing process, grammar, research, and documentation have made The Little, Brown Handbook one of the bestselling handbooks of all time. A clean, uncluttered page design uses color and type clearly to distinguish parts of the book and elements of the pages. Annotations on both visual and verbal examples connect principles and illustrations. Dictionary-style headers in the index make it easy to find entries, and helpful endpapers offer several paths to the book’s content. NEW! Streamlined explanations and new explanatory headings throughout make key information easier to find. Academic Writing NEW! A greatly expanded overview of common academic genres in the chapter on academic writing (now at the start of Part 2), such as responses, critical analyses, arguments, informative and personal writing, and research papers and reports, highlights key features of each genre and points students to examples in the handbook. NEW! A summary box titled “The writing situation” with each of the sample papers gives an overview of the situation to which the student responded–subject, purpose, audience, genre, and use of sources–thus connecting concepts with actual writing. NEW! Eighteen examples of academic writing in varied genres appear throughout the handbook, among them a new critical analysis of an advertisement and a new social-science research report documented in APA style. Synthesis receives special emphasis wherever students might need help balancing their own and others’ views, such as in responding to texts and visuals. NEW! The expanded chapter on critical reading and writing includes two full-length opinion pieces as exercises in critical reading, a new advertisement with a student’s analysis, a revised discussion of writing critically about texts and visuals, and a new critical analysis paper. Parts 9 and 10 give students a solid foundation in research writing and writing in the disciplines (literature, other humanities, social sciences, natural and applied sciences), along with extensive coverage of documentation in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! Key material on academic integrity in Chapter 6 on academic writing and Chapter 44 on plagiarism discusses developing one’s own perspective on a topic, using and managing sources, and avoiding plagiarism. Other chapters throughout the handbook reinforce these important topics. Research Writing and Documentation To help students develop their own perspectives on their research subjects, the text advises asking questions, entering into dialog with sources, and presenting multiple views fairly and responsibly. Extensive attention to research methods supports students in the early stages of research. The discussion of searching for and evaluating sources–library, Web, and social media–helps students to refine search terms and to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources. Case studies show the application of critical criteria to sample articles, Web documents, and a blog. NEW! A streamlined discussion of gathering information from sources stresses keeping accurate records of source material and marking borrowed words. Meticulous attention to research writing across the disciplines emphasizes managing information, using the library as a research gateway, evaluating and synthesizing sources, avoiding plagiarism, and documenting sources accurately. Students learn how to document and cite sources ethically in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! A chapter on documenting sources explains key features of source documentation, defines the relationship between in-text citations and a bibliography, and presents pros and cons of bibliography software. NEW! Updated, annotated samples of key source types illustrate MLA and APA documentation, showing students how to find the bibliographical information needed to cite each type and highlighting the similarities and differences between print and database sources. NEW! Reorganized chapters for all four styles group sources by type, thus simplifying the process of finding appropriate models and clarifying differences among print, database, Web, and other sources. NEW! A succinct guide accompanies the index to the models in each style to help students match their sources with appropriate citation formats. NEW! The chapter on CSE documentation reflects the new eighth edition of Scientific Style and Format: The CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers. NEW! A complete social-science research report shows APA style in the context of student writing. Two research papers illustrate MLA style and include a paper-in-progress, following a student through the research process and culminating in an annotated essay on green consumerism. The extensive chapter on avoiding plagiarism discusses deliberate and careless plagiarism, shows examples of plagiarized and revised sentences, and gives updated advice about avoiding plagiarism with online sources. Writing As a Process NEW! A reorganized presentation of drafting, revising, and editing distinguishes revising more clearly as a step separate from editing. NEW! An expanded discussion of thesis covers using the thesis statement to preview organization. NEW! New, relevant examples in Chapter 4 on paragraphs illustrate important concepts of coherence, organization, and development. NEW! A revised and streamlined chapter on presenting writing focuses on essential information related to document design, visuals and other media, writing for online environments, and oral presentations. NEW! A revised discussion of preparing a writing portfolio gives an overview of common formats and requirements. Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation NEW! Revised explanations of grammar concepts and rules throughout simplify the presentation and emphasize key material. NEW! Two common trouble spots—sentence fragments and passive voice—are discussed in greater detail and illustrated with new and more examples. NEW! Dozens of new and revised examples and exercises clarify and test important concepts. NEW! Added examples in Part 8 on effective words show common shortcuts of texting and other electronic communication and how to revise them for academic writing. Visual and Media Literacy Thorough discussions of critically reading advertisements, graphs, and other visuals appear in Chapter 7 on critical reading, Chapter 8 on reading arguments, and Chapter 43 on working with sources. NEW! A student work-in-progress illustrates the process of analyzing an advertisement and culminates in a sample critical analysis. NEW! Updated and detailed help with preparing or finding illustrations appears in Chapter 5 on presenting writing and Chapter Preface for Students: Using This Book Preface for Instructors PART 1: The Process of Writing 1. Assessing the Writing Situation a. Understanding how writing happens b. Analyzing the writing situation c. Discovering and limiting a subject d. Defining a purpose e. Considering the audience f. Understanding genres 2. Discovering and Shaping Ideas a. Discovering ideas b. Developing a thesis c. Organizing ideas SAMPLE INFORMATIVE ESSAY 3. Drafting, Revising, and Editing a. Writing the first draft b. Revising a draft c. Giving and receiving comments d. Examining a sample revision e. Editing the revised draft f. Preparing and proofreading the final draft g. SAMPLE FINAL DRAFT (RESPONSE ESSAY) h. Preparing a writing portfolio 4. Writing and Revising Paragraphs a. Relating paragraphs in the essay b. Maintaining paragraph unity c. Achieving paragraph coherence d. Developing the paragraph e. Writing special kinds of paragraphs 5. Presenting Writing a. Formatting academic writing SAMPLE MARKETING REPORT b. Using visuals and other media in multimodal writing c. Presenting writing on the Web SAMPLE WEB SITE SAMPLE LITERACY NARRATIVE POSTED TO A BLOG d. Making oral presentations SAMPLE POWERPOINT SLIDES PART 2: Reading and Writing in and out of College 6. Writing in Academic Situations a. Determining purpose and audienceb. Using an academic genrec. Choosing structure and content d. Using sources with integritye. Using academic language f. Communicating with instructors and classmates 7. Critical Reading and Writing a. Using techniques of critical reading b. Summarizing c. Developing a critical response d. Viewing visuals critically e. Writing criticallyf. Examining sample critical analyses SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF A TEXT SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF AN IMAGE 8. Reading Arguments Critically a. Recognizing the elements of argument b. Testing claims c. Weighing evidence d. Discovering assumptions e. Watching language, hearing tone f. Judging reasonableness g. Recognizing fallacies h. Reading visual arguments 9. Writing an Argument a. Finding a subject b. Conceiving a thesis statement c. Analyzing your purpose and your audience d. Using reason e. Using evidence f. Reaching your readers g. Organizing your argument h. Revising your argument i. SAMPLE PROPOSAL ARGUMENT 10. Taking Essay Exams a. Preparing for an essay examination b. Planning your time and your answer c. Starting the essay d. Developing the essay e. Rereading the essay 11. Public Writing a. Writing on social media b. Writing business letters and memos SAMPLE LETTER AND MEMO c. Writing a job application SAMPLE LETTER AND RESUMES d. Writing business reports and proposals SAMPLE REPORT AND PROPOSAL e. Writing for community work SAMPLE NEWSLETTER, ONLINE POST PART 3: Grammatical Sentences 12. Understanding Sentence Grammar a. Understanding the basic sentence b. Expanding the basic sentence with single words c. Expanding the basic sentence with word groups d. Compounding words, phrases, and clauses e. Changing the usual word order f. Classifying sentences 13. Case of Nouns and Pronouns a. Compound subjects and complements b. Compound objects c. We or us with a noun d. Appositives e. Pronoun after than or as in a comparison f. Subjects and objects of infinitives g. Who vs. whom h. Case before a gerund 14. Verbs Verb Forms a. Regular and irregular verbs b. Sit and set; lie and lay; rise and raise c. Omitted -s and -ed endings d. Helping verbs e. Verb plus gerund or infinitive f. Verb plus participle Tense g. Appropriate tense for meaning h. Sequence of tenses Mood i. Subjunctive verb forms Voice j. Active vs. passive voice 15. Agreement a. Agreement between subject and verb b. Agreement between pronoun and antecedent 16. Adjectives and Adverbs a. Adjectives only with nouns and pronouns b. Adjectives after linking verbs c. Adjectives with objects; adverbs with verbs d. Comparative and superlative forms e. Double negatives f. Overuse of nouns as modifiers g. Present and past participles as adjectives h. A, an, the, and other determiners PART 4: Clear Sentences 17. Sentence Fragments a. Tests for sentence completeness, revision of fragments b. Subordinate clause c. Verbal or prepositional phrase d. Other fragments e. Acceptable uses of incomplete sentences 18. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences a. Main clauses not joined by coordinating conjunction b. Main clauses related by a conjunctive adverb or transitional expression c. Main clauses with no conjunction or punctuation 19. Pronoun Reference a. Clear reference to one antecedent b. Clear placement of pronoun and antecedent c. Reference to specific antecedent d. Indefinite use of you e. Clear use of it f. Appropriate who, which, that 20. Shifts a. Person and number b. Tense and mood c. Subject and voice d. Indirect and direct quotations and questions 21. Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers a.For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks - unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliability The Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available-with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab(TM) not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.02.2020
Zum Angebot
How to Make Money Work for You: Opportunities O...
9,95 € *
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Making money online is not magic or secret nowadays. You just need to know some techniques. Suppose you have writing skills; then why can’t you earn from the power of your mind? The world wide web is a huge space that is filled with ways wherein you can earn money by simply just having your own computer and Internet connection. Everyone is talking about it, but only a few know exactly how to earn money online the proper way.   The Internet is open to everyone, so why not get a slice of the money pie it offers? But time and effort must be exerted for this to come into fruition. Again, there are lots of ways to earn money online without any website involved. (Though these days, websites are becoming your most valuable online "real-estate"). You can start building and owning online to generate passive income even while you're sleeping. Here is a summary audiobook to lay out some fundamental strategies with which you can kick off.  Audiobook content includes:  "Unique Tips to Make Money Online""How to Use the Online Tools to Make Money Fast""How to Effectively Make Money Online Without any Website""How to Make Money with Internet Marketing - Training, Tools, and Patience""Make Money Through Blogging""Work at Home and Make Money""Make Money Your Friend""How to Make Money Online Economically" 1. Language: English. Narrator: Brittany Schank. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/133759/bk_acx0_133759_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Thinking in Java
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Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoIntended for Java programmers, this book explains the why of Java. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its advanced features, it is designed to teach, one step at a time. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, and more.

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Stand: 21.02.2020
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